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The images on this page are pulled from my collection (except where noted) of early 1900-1919 vintage patterns, catalogues and photos. I do love to draw inspiration for my designs from the real things. Click on the thumbnails to view the full-sized images. (Note: The images are in order by date, so scroll the whole page to find new images in each section.)

[Note: Feel free to download these images for your own personal enjoyment. If you wish to share them on a website, please download and save them to your own server and provide a credit line or link back to this site. None of the images or patterns here are for sale. Thank you!]


Note the varying waistline heights in this circa 1912-3 photograph. Five Friends

1912 Sock AdHere is an ad for men's socks from a 1912 ladies' magazine. His suit is great, but I love her simple gown!

1912 Pattern

A wonderful circa 1912 pattern for a young woman's dresses. The differing front bodice closures are fun to study.
(Many thanks to the Kerrie Lyons Collection for the loan!)


Here is a lovely example of a Titanic-era tea dress.
Note all the trimming on the bodice and the skirt draping. Simply fantastic.



A beautifully illustrated cover from a 1912 Collier's magazine. The young man looks smashing in his suit and tweed hat, and I just love the casual elegance of the woman's day dress and wonderful hairstyle.


This is an original ca. 1911-12 afternoon dress from my collection. It was probably a deep lavender originally, but it has faded to a muted violet. I love the lace detailing.

Here's a great ad for corsets from a 1912 catalogue. Note the corset on the lower left for nursing moms. These are extremely rare and valuable now.


1912 PetticoatsPetticoats and corset covers pictured in a 1912 catalogue.

1912 ApronThis pattern is for a "dress protector"--fancy name for an apron. I offer this in my catalogue as item #1912.
It works beautifully as a jumper over a blouse and petticoat.

The "unsinkable" Molly Brown, who survived the Titanic tragedy.
(This picture ran in the March 16, 1998, issue of People.)
Molly Brown

Lady Cosmo Duff Gordon Lady Duff Gordon, also a Titanic survivor.
Lady Gordon designed clothing and was the first couturier
to use a catwalk for her models!
(This picture ran in the March 16, 1998, issue of People.)
Note: I have now added a section devoted to the designs of Lucile, Lady Duff-Gordon!

An original pattern for a ladies' "coat dress," this is very similar to the "flying" dress worn by Kate Winslet in "Titanic." To see the outfit I've made from this pattern, click here and scroll down.1912 Coat Dress

I costumed a new Titanic documentary, titled "Women and Children First," in April of 1998. Here are two of the extras used in the filming (the one on the left is yours truly!). The dress on the right is straight out of a 1912 ladies' catalogue and features beautiful draping and inset details. The outfit on the right was made up of a walking skirt and fantastic jacket with braided trimming.



This stunning gown was sold on eBay by USVainen, a seller whose knowledge of vintage fashion is astounding and whose descriptions are delightful. This seller has graciously agreed to let me share her images and words on my site, and I think you'll enjoy them as much as I have! The decriptions are detailed, so to read them in their entirety, you'll need to click on the links at the end of each opening remark. Well worth the reading!

Elegant 1913 Silk Wedding Dress with Long Train and Blown Glass Decorations. This is a classic example of American taste and elegance: a wonderful ivory silk wedding or formal dress from the Titanic era. This dress' hobble skirt ("hobble" was the term given to skirts or dresses whose bottom hem was so narrow that the only way a woman could walk in the dress would be with short mincing steps - she was in effect 'hobbled'), silhouette figure, emphasis on the sides of the dress and lack of waist lead me to date to around 1913 - 1 year after the Titanic. Click here to continue the description!

This is a marvelous original tea gown or afternoon dress ca. 1913. My model posed in it for me while we were having tea in the Ritz-Carlton's sumptuous tea room! This dress features the overskirts that became so popular in the early 'teens and has wonderful sleeves with cuffs matching the collar. Flowered pink silk was used for the entire dress, and it is impossible to describe its elegant look and feel. The details on this piece are fabulous, from the triangular panels in the bodice front and back to the piping trimming all the edges to the hand-tied French knots that decorate the sleeves. I intend to take close-up shots of the gown and will post them at a later date. There's just so much to see on this beautful gown.


Dresses from a 1914 catalogue. Note the varied overskirts, ruffles and trims.1914 Dresses

Here is a circa 1914 evening gown, which is on display at the Museum of the City of New York. Rhinestone embroidered tulle over pale lavender satin, ice-blue chiffon tunic edged with rhinestones and satin glass bead fringe by the eminent designer, Frederick Worth. The gown was originally worn by Mrs. William Storrs Wells.



What a wonderful color! This is an original linen afternoon suit circa 1913-1915. Note all of the marvelous details, including the double peplum, the crisp white linen collar and cuffs and the tailored skirt. This is a "transition" fashion--right between the era of the slim skirt (1911-1913) and the flounced waistline (1914-1917). It looks perfect for an afternoon stroll or a visit with friends at a lovely tearoom in the city. (From the collection of Elizabeth M. Brick)


This beautiful tea dress was sold on eBay by USVainen, a seller whose knowledge of vintage fashion is astounding and whose descriptions are delightful. This seller has graciously agreed to let me share her images and words on my site, and I think you'll enjoy them as much as I have! The decriptions are detailed, so to read them in their entirety, you'll need to click on the links at the end of each opening remark. Well worth the reading! Check other sections on the page for more from USVainen.

1915 Hand Embroidered Lace Tea Dress. This is a wonderful tea dress that was hand embroidered and detailed (as were so many dresses from the World War I years). This dress is very strong and sturdy and could be worn daily. Even nicer, it has very clean and modern styling that would look very nice as regular wear at the office or home. The lace was patterned with a very lovely art nouveau pattern of swirls and flowers at the bottom. Click here to continue the description!

This is a friend of mine, showing off one of the beautiful 19-teens suits from her collection. Errin has a fantastic website herself, which features some of the things in her own wearable vintage collection!



Sewing Patterns:
Vintage Patterns for Sale

Don't miss these sites if you want to purchase original vintage patterns!


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