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The images on this page are pulled from late 18th and early 19th century fashion plates, illustrations and paintings, as well as recent film adaptations of Jane Austen novels. Click on the thumbnails to view the the full-sized images.

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These photos were taken in 1998 during Berryville, Virginia's 200th anniversary. The men look so sharp, and the ladies are lovely in their gowns. I especially like the Spencer jacket on the blonde gal.


Fashion plate of a woman wearing a spencer jacket, circa 1818.Spencer

Lady in a Pink BonnetThis illustration is from a 1911 cover of Ladies Home Journal.
I love this very accurate and beautiful painting of a young woman in a pink bonnet.

Two Regency Ladies with SoldierRegency Illustration

These illustrations are from a 1910 novel, D'Ri and I, by Irving Bacheller. The story is set during the War of 1812.
I think the gowns illustrated here are just lovely.


Here is a Regency lady dancing in her ball dress.
Note the unique overskirt with tasseled trim.
Lady Dancing

The gorgeous portrait on the left shows the Grecian influence so prevalent during the Regency period (particularly from 1800-1818). Note the trim on the sleeves and the gold band in the lady's hair. I just love this painting. The very elegant lady on the right wears a bright yellow gown with a fantastic shawl. The painting is purely pre-Raphaelite, but I do love the details, and the outfit is quite accurate. Note the tall hat. Thank you to Verity for the scans!


This is an original ballgown from 1818. Note the beaded fabric and gold trim details. The sleeves are very large, which points to the late Regency or Empire period.


Here is something quite unique. These photographs were taken in the late 1800s. The young woman pictured is wearing an 1820s dress with a "calash" bonnet (very typical of the late 18th century through the early 19th). Perhaps she is modeling what her grandmother wore? At any rate, it is a fascinating look at a Victorian modeling the fashions of a previous era!


Regency BonnetsFashion plate of Regency bonnets.
These stayed in style pretty much through the 1820s.

A hilarious Regency cartoon, poking fun at the increasingly deep bonnet styles of the late 18-teens.Bonnet Cartoon

Regency TrainsAnother cartoon, this one spoofing the length of some ladies' trains.



Top left: "Mariann" and "Elinor" ride in the coach to their new home in "Sense and Sensibility." I love the bonnet Kate Winslet is wearing. Top center: The Dashwood ladies listen attentively to their mysterious guest. Mariann's daydress is simple and lovely. Top right: Elinor meets Miss Lucy Steele. Note the pelisse Elinor is wearing--a style seen briefly in the late 1790s. Middle left and center: Willoughby and Mariann picnic together. Mariann's pelisse is similar in style to Elinor's. I love her hat in this scene as well. Middle right: Elinor and Mariann. Bottom: Elinor and Mariann at the ball in London. Note the wide trim at the top of Elinor's gown and the fitted sleeves on Mariann's gown.

EmmaEmmaEmma

EmmaEmmaEmmaEmma

Here are several shots from the Miramax "Emma," starring Gwyneth Paltrow. Clockwise from top left: Day dress of a lovely sage green with a patterned muslin overdress; plainer day dress with gathered bodice and a gorgeous shawl; day dress of striped pink with a more squared neckline; morning dress with "drop-front" bodice; ball gown with sheer sleeves (The shoes are totally wrong, by the way! Pure 1990s.); ball gown again with several other ladies in the background (Note the marvelous skirt trim on the dress in the left corner.); two beautiful ballgowns with great details. At the bottom left is Emma's wonderful wedding gown with the sheer sleeves and delicate ribbon detailing. Love the veil, too! On the bottom right is the gown Jane Fairfax wears to the wedding. The details are lovely. Note the sleeve trimming, the front buttons and the lace around the neck. I love the delicate undersleeves as well.

Left: One of Elizabeth Bennet's beautiful Spencer jackets from the recent A&E "Pride and Prejudice" miniseries. This one features nice sleeve details with "toothed" sleeve caps.
Center: Three Bennet sisters show off their ballgowns. Notice the crossover front on the far right gown and the lovely gathered bodice front on the center gown.
Right: Two more ballgowns. I love the color of the one on the left.

Above: A scene of Elizabeth dancing at the Netherfield Ball.


Here is just one of Kim Brecklein's beautiful Empire paper dolls. I "colored" this one on my computer. The dolls come on white cardstock that you can color or paint yourself, and they are wonderfully well done. The costumes are delightful. Visit Kim's site for information on this and all of her paper dolls. It's almost as much fun as dressing yourself!


This is Kate Winslet in the film adaptation of Jude the Obscure. The fabric used for this day dress is wonderful--very rich in color yet simple. Jude is actually not set in the Regency period, but some of the styling details on this gown are similar to Regency designs. Very pretty.


The gowns above are on display in Jane Austen's house, Chawton, England. Note the beautiful shawl and the draping detail on the bodice at the right. Below is a photo from A&E's "Emma," and you can see the same draping detail was used for Jane Fairfax's ballgown.


Here is a scrumptious early 1820s ballgown (when all the puffs and furbelows really came back into style with a bang!). Look at all the detailing on this gown and imagine the work! The slashed sleeves are simply a feast for the eyes, and the embroidery on the bodice just amazes me with its perfect stitchery. This is another gown you can see in Jane Ashelford's book, The Art of Dress.


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