Regency Underthings Pattern

By Jennie Chancey

Here are the underpinnings you need to give you the proper Regency foundation! This package includes patterns for a chemise, short stays, and two chemisettes. The chemise was modeled from original garments in several museum collections and features an adjustable drawstring neckline and gussets under the arms for a comfortable fit. The short stays lace in the front and were based upon extant stays in museum collections as well as period drawings of these transitional undergarments. The chemisettes were drawn from portraits of the time as well as Janet Arnold’s excellent research in Patterns of Fashion I. Begin with the chemise next to the skin, then add your stays for the correct silhouette. To create a smooth line beneath your gowns, add a long petticoat over your stays, which you can easily make from the Regency Gown pattern above (omitting the sleeves). For daytime, put a chemisette over your undergarments, then don your gown. Voila’! A full Regency wardrobe!

  • Sizes 6-26D all included in one envelope.
  • Illustrated instructions make construction easy!
  • Notes on original undergarments of the time as well as tips for wearing the undergarments.
  • Click to download the Regency Underthings yardage chart.
  • Photo Instructions available as a downloadable PDF — Click HERE!
  • Also available for instant download as an ePattern in PDF format!

The stays are rated “intermediate,” but the chemise and chemisettes are simple enough for a beginner. I am always available through the Contact Form if you have questions! Do note that the short stays will not offer ample enough support for sizes above “DD” without serious modifications. I would instead recommend the excellent Regency Stays pattern by The Mantua Maker, which is for longer (hip-length) stays and can be easily modified to support larger cup sizes.

FITTING HELPS: Do not miss this excellent tutorial for help in fitting stays perfectly!

Note: If you purchased a copy of this pattern prior to April 2007, click HERE for corrections/revisions.

Paper Pattern $15.95
ePattern $9.95

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108 Comments on Regency Underthings Pattern

  1. Beatrice
    October 3, 2010 at 10:02 pm (4 years ago)

    What is a good place to purchase boning?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      October 5, 2010 at 1:03 pm (4 years ago)

      Hi, Beatrice! I recommend CorsetMaking.com for steel boning, but it’s actually much cheaper (and even more authentic) to simply purchase flat wooden reeds at a craft store like Michaels or Hobby Lobby and cut them to the proper length. That way you get the perfect fit for every channel, whereas steel boning only comes in set lengths. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Terry
      October 17, 2010 at 3:54 pm (3 years ago)

      Beatrice, I used plastic cable ties for the short stays, because I wanted something washable. They worked very well.

      Reply
  2. Stefanie
    October 17, 2010 at 7:22 pm (3 years ago)

    I’m trying to understand how this goes. I wear a chemise, then a short stay to hold up my bust, then a chemisette on top of the other two and then the dress? And purchasing this pattern will give me all the patterns I need to sew the chemise, stay and chemisette?

    Sorry for all the questions but this is my first time making anything like this. I really like the “Pride and Prejudice” dress look and would love to know how to get the correct look.
    Thank you for any help you can provide.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      October 17, 2010 at 8:03 pm (3 years ago)

      Hi, Stefanie! Yes, the chemise is the first garment you put on. The stays go over that for bust support. The chemisette is optional. It’s an item that was mainly worn as neckline filler during the day–never for evenings unless you were an older chaperon and didn’t intend to “stand up” with a gentleman for a dance. ;) Hope this helps!

      Reply
  3. Beatrice
    December 15, 2010 at 6:52 pm (3 years ago)

    Thank you so much! I’m on a tight budget so flat wood reads would be great,I would much rather spend more on fabric than on boning that nobody is going to see anyway, and the more authentic the better:D

    Reply
  4. Constance
    January 25, 2011 at 6:11 pm (3 years ago)

    Do you think a cotton canvas 260 g per square meter would work for the lining and interlining of the short stay?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      January 26, 2011 at 12:37 am (3 years ago)

      Hi! No need to line with anything that heavy–just a regular muslin will work. But that will be great for the interlining!

      Reply
  5. Constance
    January 27, 2011 at 7:41 am (3 years ago)

    Hi Jennie,
    thanks for the quick answer. I’m glad I can use the canvas because I couldn’t find any coutil around here.

    Reply
  6. Lucy
    January 27, 2011 at 6:58 pm (3 years ago)

    Mrs. Chancey,
    Will the stays from the Regency era pattern work underneath the ladies’ Georgian portrait dress or is it essential that I use the longer stays pattern from Mantua Maker? I was thinking since I will need the chemise from the Regency underthings pattern anyways, it would be nice if I could buy one pattern rather than two!
    I am relishing your exquisitely gracious designs!
    Thank you,
    Lucy

    Reply
  7. Lucy
    January 27, 2011 at 7:00 pm (3 years ago)

    Mrs. Chancey,
    Will the stays from the Regency era pattern work underneath the ladies’ Georgian portrait dress or is it essential that I use the longer stays pattern from Mantua Maker? I was thinking since I will need the chemise from the Regency underthings pattern anyways, it would be nice if I could buy one pattern rather than two!
    I am relishing your exquisitely graceful designs!
    Thank you,
    Lucy

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      January 28, 2011 at 12:54 am (3 years ago)

      Hi, Lucy! Regency stays will create the wrong silhouette for the Georgian era. The Regency silhouette is a high, rounded “shelf” bustline, while the Georgian Era silhouette is pretty much flat all down the front. ;) Sorry you can’t make the Underthings pattern do double-duty here! So glad you’re enjoying my site!

      Reply
  8. Lucy
    January 29, 2011 at 7:04 pm (3 years ago)

    Thank you for getting back to me, Mrs. Chancey. I certainly want to have the right look, so I do appreciate your advice!

    Reply
  9. Kristen
    February 11, 2011 at 9:33 pm (3 years ago)

    Jennie,

    What would a nursing mother have worn for support and easy access for her nursling under her gown? I’ve looked at several of the posts on modifying the Regency gown for nursing but I’m curious about what undergarments would work with both the gown and a nursing babe!

    It seems it would be simple to add openings to the chemise for nursing but I’m not sure how the stays would work?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      February 12, 2011 at 2:14 am (3 years ago)

      Hi, Kristin! Nursing moms wore long stays with gussets that opened or short stays that simply folded down for nursing access. I made my short stays soft (quilting instead of boning), and simply unlaced the top and folded down each side for nursing access. The chemise needs no openings; you just loosen the drawstring and lower the neckline for access. I successfully nursed twins with full Regency garb, so it can be done!

      Reply
  10. Kristen
    February 12, 2011 at 4:59 pm (3 years ago)

    Thank you Jennie! I think I will plan on quilting the short stays :)

    Reply
  11. Shell
    February 22, 2011 at 9:07 am (3 years ago)

    Hi Jennie,
    I have just followed your link to mantuamaker.com, but i can’t seam to find what you are talking about. The only stay/corset link there is a corset training course. I am an F cup so obviously need more than the regency short stays, can you help please?
    thanks so much,

    Reply
  12. Victoria
    March 3, 2011 at 12:55 pm (3 years ago)

    Hi Mrs. Chancey!

    I own the Simplicity version of the Regency underthings pattern, which I understand you designed. Will this one work as well as the one from your website? Or is this one more period?
    I’m a college student on a tight budget, but want to do things correctly!

    Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      March 4, 2011 at 1:27 am (3 years ago)

      Hi, Victoria! The Simplicity version is the same as my original except that it runs a size too large. Definitely (as always) make a toile to check the fit of the stays before cutting out your “real” stays. :-) No worries on the chemise–it is meant to be large, so just go a size down from what you measure, and it will fit fine.

      Reply
  13. Colleen C McCaffrey
    March 12, 2011 at 11:20 pm (3 years ago)

    What kind of changes would you make for a larger busted woman? I have issues with my lower back and cannot wear a full corset, but seeing the short stays, I may be able to adapt them for the larger bust (42 H). I am just wanting to know if you think it is possible, before I attempt that level of pattern adaptation. Thanks.

    Reply
  14. Lindsay
    March 14, 2011 at 10:31 am (3 years ago)

    Oh yay. I’m a 38H and her stays look great! I also have the Simplicity stays pattern.. but it’s the smaller version. Can I use basic pattern enlargement techniques to enlarge it to something more my size (I realize I will have to do more changes for that “H” cup size)? Or would that throw off the width..?

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      March 14, 2011 at 10:35 am (3 years ago)

      You can use the Simplicity pattern, but remember it runs a size larger than my version, so keep that in mind as you size it up. Just test every stage in muslin before cutting into your fashion material, and you’ll be set!

      Reply
  15. Kristina
    March 26, 2011 at 9:20 pm (3 years ago)

    Does this pattern still come with the standing collar chemisette variation? I didn’t see that it was mentioned. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      March 27, 2011 at 1:29 am (3 years ago)

      Hello, Kristina! Yes, there are instructions for the standing collar as well as the cutting lines. Those were only omitted from the Simplicity version of this pattern.

      Reply
  16. Courtney
    April 21, 2011 at 1:08 pm (3 years ago)

    Hi, Mrs. Chancey,
    Just a quick question for now:
    What happens if I make a Regency-era gown from your Elegant Lady’s Closet and do not wear the period underpinnings, but instead modern undergarments? I wanted to make a Regency gown for my piano recital and folk-dancing ball, so I’m not as concerned with being historically correct. Would I not get the look I’m going for if I don’t use these underpinnings?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      April 22, 2011 at 8:52 am (3 years ago)

      Hello, Courtney! Because the bodice pieces are much shorter for the dresses in the Elegant Lady’s Closet, you will have to lengthen them to cover a normal bustline. Stays push you inward and create a bit of a “shelf” look, so cut out a muslin bodice and test it over your preferred undergarments to see how much length you need to add to the bodice pieces. I will warn you that the drawstring look is just not flattering over a modern bustline unless you are an “A” cup–larger sizes really look (ahem) “out there!” Have fun sewing!

      Reply
  17. Courtney
    April 26, 2011 at 1:33 pm (3 years ago)

    Thanks for the answer! I just purchased the Elegant Lady’s Closet, and so I plan to make my dress! I will definitely make the muslin bodice. My sewing teacher, my grandma, is an expert seamstress and so she and I should be able to get this done in time. And, I’m safe with the cup size. ;)
    Thanks again! I hope to buy more of your patterns in the future!

    Reply
  18. Olga
    May 24, 2011 at 4:44 pm (3 years ago)

    I thought this was only corded- I would like to make one, (I never made a corset before) but I do not see from the images where the boning is located. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      May 25, 2011 at 12:24 am (3 years ago)

      Olga, it is difficult to see boning channels, as the thread is white on white. Suggested placement of boning is on either side of the center front opening (by the lacing holes), then diagonally on either side of the outer bust gussets toward the side seam and in the side seams themselves. I include diagrams for boning, cording, and quilting options in the pattern. Thanks!

      Reply
  19. Olga
    May 25, 2011 at 7:55 pm (3 years ago)

    Thank you, Jennie. I am looking forward to attempting it!

    Reply
  20. kathy
    July 21, 2011 at 6:13 pm (3 years ago)

    I just finished my first Regency Chemise from the Underthings Pattern and I am so thrilled!!! I want to make several more to really get it down, and then I’ll attempt the Regency gown pattern that I also purchased. This is a lot different than making the same pattern for little girls and for dolls. Love your patterns. I’m having so muc fun. Kathy

    Reply
  21. Jennie Chancey
    July 22, 2011 at 1:38 am (3 years ago)

    Oh, I’m so glad, Kathy! Send in pictures if you care to share your final outfits!

    Reply
  22. Pam
    July 29, 2011 at 9:27 am (3 years ago)

    I have a VERY small bust… Practically nonexistent, in fact. How will this affect choosing a size for the stays?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      July 29, 2011 at 2:40 pm (3 years ago)

      Hi, Pam! I have instructions for ladies who are “nearly A” in the pattern. You really do not need stays to get the proper silhouette if you are an “A” or nearly A, but the option is there if you prefer to have them. :)

      Reply
  23. Mrs. C
    August 22, 2011 at 10:42 am (3 years ago)

    I’d like to know…how comfortable are the stays to wear day in and day out? Do they compress your body very much, so as to cut off lymph drainage, or cause other circulatory problems? How do they compare to wearing a modern bra?

    I ask because…..over the past 2-3 years I have developed an intolerance to wearing a traditional bra, they are very uncomfortable for me. I have gone to short cami’s, but they do not do a very good job of “supporting the tissue.” I am about a 38C size. So, I am looking for an alternative…

    Also, do either the short stays or the long stays provide any sort of back or posture support?

    Thanks for any advice!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      August 22, 2011 at 11:45 am (3 years ago)

      Hello, Mrs. C.!

      If you make the stays unboned (soft), they are as comfortable to wear as a sports bra. There is no “constriction” in a well-fitted set of stays–only bust support. The way the straps are designed also encourages upright posture, gently pulling the shoulders back, so this prevents slumping (but not uncomfortably). Long stays from this time period (which I do not offer but you can get from The Mantua Maker) do not compress the body–they just provide support for the bust. However, if you make long stays with a busk down the center front, they do provide more posture support than short stays.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  24. Mrs. C
    August 22, 2011 at 12:50 pm (3 years ago)

    Yes, this info is a great help! I will definately try them! (Sewing machine in repair shop at present, hope to have it back soon!)

    One more quick question—when you mentioned using “flat wooden reeds from Hobby Lobby” in a post above, are you referring to basket-making reed, or something different? I would like to try it but am not sure exactly what product you mean.

    Thank you so very much!!!

    Reply
  25. Jennie Chancey
    August 23, 2011 at 3:57 am (3 years ago)

    Hi again! You don’t want highly flexible basket reed. I’m not sure what Hobby Lobby calls this stuff, but it’s in with all the balsa wood and other supplies for carving and woodwork. It comes in lengths around 18-24″ and is easy to cut but will snap if bent to a 90-degree angle. Hope that helps!

    Reply
  26. Crystal Bedney
    November 22, 2011 at 4:44 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi I’m looking for some place to purchase a short stay,or for someone to make one for me, since I no longer have a sewing machine.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      November 23, 2011 at 2:06 pm (2 years ago)

      Hi, Crystal! For form-fitting undergarments, it is usually best to find someone locally who can make them, as that person will be able to fit the toile to you and make sure the stays are correct. However, if you are confident that you can provide accurate measurements, my Seamstress-in-Residence can make stays for you. I’d recommend that you request her to mail the fitting toile to you for a try-on, as that step really is crucial to having a correct set of stays. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  27. Rebecca Lou
    December 5, 2011 at 9:03 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi Mrs. Chancey,
    I was originally looking for a Regency stay pattern to help keep my stomach from being noticeable with the empire waistline. Do you think it would be possible for me to edit the pattern to include a piece below the stay for that purpose?

    Your thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      December 6, 2011 at 5:07 am (2 years ago)

      Hi, Rebecca! You really need full stays–longline stays that go over the tummy and hips. I recommend the Mantua Maker’s Regency Stays. Just be sure you make a toile for a try-on, as that pattern tends to run about a size too small. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  28. Stephanie Johanesen
    December 8, 2011 at 6:47 pm (2 years ago)

    Dear Jennie,

    thank you for adding a link to my post on proper fit for Regency Stays! I’m so flattered!

    Stephanie Johanesen
    Founder, Oregon Regency Society.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      December 11, 2011 at 2:27 pm (2 years ago)

      It’s simply fantastic, Stephanie! Best thing written on fitting stays that I’ve seen, and so thorough. Thanks for posting it!

      Reply
  29. Mollie
    January 1, 2012 at 10:00 pm (2 years ago)

    i’m very busty and i wanted to know if the flat wooden reeds would work for me or should i buy the bonning? and on booklet that came with the patterns has the website: http://www.granndagarb.com- to buy boning from but that isnt a website :/ thanks for the help

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      January 2, 2012 at 1:39 am (2 years ago)

      Hi, Mollie! Unfortunately, Grannd Garb has gone out of business. I’ve removed that notice from the latest edition of the instructions, so you must have gotten an earlier one. Sorry about that! Flat wooden reeds will work nicely on you. Just be sure you are getting a hard wood rather than balsa, and you’ll be set. They are much, much easier to use, since you can cut them to the correct length rather than having to special order the metal boning to the proper length. Have fun sewing!

      Reply
  30. Mollie
    January 5, 2012 at 2:54 pm (2 years ago)

    thank you!

    Reply
  31. Nina
    January 9, 2012 at 2:57 am (2 years ago)

    Jeannie, all I could find at the fabric store today for the chemise was batiste (65% poly/35% cotton) or poplin (97% cotton/3% spandex). Which would you recommend be used? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      January 11, 2012 at 2:05 am (2 years ago)

      Hi, Nina! You need to look for muslin, which is 100% cotton. Wearing a poly blend close to the skin tends to make the wearer perspire more. I’ve never found a fabric store that didn’t carry bleached and unbleached muslin, but you may have to look in the linings section or quilting section. If you absolutely cannot find any (which would be very unusual!), go with whatever has the most cotton content and is lightweight and breathable. I hope this helps, and thanks for your patience in awaiting an answer. Our Internet was out for three days! Warmly, Jennie

      Reply
  32. Emily
    January 9, 2012 at 5:44 pm (2 years ago)

    I was wondering if you could tell me the pattern number for Simplicity’s version of underthings? I’m debating which pattern to order (I’d love to order yours, but I’m on a budget. :( Maybe someday), but I can’t find it on the Simplicity website.

    Reply
  33. Deena Mauldin
    January 18, 2012 at 9:19 pm (2 years ago)

    Metal boning can be cut to fit, filed down, and coated in tool dip if you find yourself with lots of the wrong size of boning.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      January 19, 2012 at 8:33 am (2 years ago)

      Yes, but I’ve found it pretty hard to cut and file without special tools, so that’s why I recommend reed boning instead. Metal does offer more support for larger cup sizes (and is harder to break), but I sure wish it was easier to work with for a custom fit!

      Reply
  34. Hannah
    March 20, 2012 at 8:56 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi Jennie,

    I am working on the chemise, but have gotten stuck on the arm gussets. Is there a tutorial for this?

    Thanks,
    Hannah

    Reply
  35. Jennie Chancey
    March 21, 2012 at 7:22 am (2 years ago)

    Hi, Hannah! Photo instructions are being formatted right now, but I’ve gone ahead and emailed you the photos for the chemise steps. Hope this helps!

    Reply
  36. Carol
    March 31, 2012 at 2:10 pm (2 years ago)

    I used the Simplicity verson of this pattern… and wish I’d have saw this before I started … made my stay using the measurements and it’s too big. any tips on adjusting this or do I need to make another?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      March 31, 2012 at 2:34 pm (2 years ago)

      I’m so sorry, Carol! Yes, they “upsized” all the pieces even though I warned them not to, as stays need to be firmly fitted to the body! If you’ve already completed the stays, I’m afraid it’s much too hard to make adjustments. I always tell folks to make a fitting toile out of muslin and test it over the Regency chemise before cutting out all the rest of the pieces (outer fabric and lining). You want to make sure the gussets hit you in the right place, the straps don’t slide off your shoulders, etc. Toiles save so much grief! Let me know if you have any questions on the second set of stays, and I’ll be happy to help. :)

      Reply
  37. Carol
    March 31, 2012 at 4:09 pm (2 years ago)

    I have the second set of stays cut out… I did the next size down. I normally wear a 38C bra and measure to fit a size 16 on simplicty pattern and that is what I made first that doesn’t fit– to get it to fit I’d need the laces part to over lap a good inch or more. I’m going to make the size 14 and use the C cup. When making the toile do you just sew one set of the pieces together out of muslin and then poke holes in for lacing and lace it up? I tried on the first one before I sewed the 3 layers together but since it was the first time I ever wore them I didn’t realise how they fit and it didn’t really tell me much. LOL I know know that I should have a gap between the staight part in the front where the laces are… right? I also have the Simplicity dress pattern anything I need to know before sewing that out? Luckily I did buy the girls size pattern from you for my daughter so that should go easier. :)

    Reply
  38. Carol
    March 31, 2012 at 4:12 pm (2 years ago)

    Oh forgot to mention I did not put the laces on before I tried the first time … only put those laces on once it was all sewn together

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      March 31, 2012 at 4:51 pm (2 years ago)

      Hi again, Carol! I wrote up a list of the differences between Simplicity’s versions and my originals at http://sensibility.com/pattern/differences.htm. As you’ll see, all the pieces are a size larger than what they should be. So cutting out the 14 is a better starting point for you. You do not need to lace up the try-on stays. Just put them on over the chemise and pull them snugly so the front edges are about 1-1 1/2″ apart. Remember that a toile will stretch a bit, unlike the final three-layered stays, which will be stiffer. But if the gussets hit you properly and the front has a gap, you are on your way! Also be sure to check the straps to make sure they don’t fall off your shoulders. If you have sloping shoulders, it’s a good idea to run a drawstring through the top casing as well as the lower edge’s casing. You can also shorten the straps if you have a high bust point to start with. I hope this helps!

      Reply
  39. Carol
    March 31, 2012 at 6:07 pm (2 years ago)

    Thanks for all the help! I have my dress, stays, chemise to make and my 8 yr olds dress to make before the tea on May 20. I want to make bonnets if there is any time. LOL So I really need to get things right the first time. I did sew the dress boddice together to try on before I made it into a dress and that is when I realised I really do need the correct under things for it to fit correctly. Now… off to look at that link. :)

    Reply
  40. Carol
    March 31, 2012 at 6:26 pm (2 years ago)

    I read your link… so the dress bodice to short isn’t an underwear problem but a pattern problem…. so you might recommend I make a 14 toile bodice and try your tutorial to lengthen the bodice? When I do a toile for this dress I just need to make the bodice no sleeves? Or do I need to add the sleeves?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      April 1, 2012 at 1:26 am (2 years ago)

      No need to put sleeves in your toile for the try-on. You’re just testing the fit of the bodice. And, yes, you can just add the correct length for your cup size to the Simplicity pattern to fix that error, but I still recommend correct underpinnings if you really want the right silhouette. A modern bra just really doesn’t fit the look of the period, which was “columnar.” A modern bra tends to give you a very “out there” (ahem!) look in the bust, which is not as pretty as when everything is held in properly! ;)

      Reply
  41. Katie
    May 23, 2012 at 9:23 am (2 years ago)

    What differance is the metal or wooden stays?? Which holds up the best and is washable? Obvousely the wooden is cheeper which is what I would go for unless it doesn’t hold up.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      May 23, 2012 at 10:27 am (2 years ago)

      Hi, Katie! Metal stays are obviously more durable, but they’re also more difficult to have cut to the correct length (which will vary according to your size). If you get flat wooden reed for boning and candle the ends (melting wax over the edges), they will flex nicely without breaking and will last a good, long time. They can also be custom-cut to fit and are washable (unlike metal, which can rust over time). Hope this helps!

      Reply
  42. Penny
    June 14, 2012 at 2:35 pm (2 years ago)

    Jennie –

    How do you feel about plastic boning? How does it rate compared to metal or wooden bones?

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      June 14, 2012 at 2:39 pm (2 years ago)

      Hi, Penny! Personally, I don’t use it. It’s easy to cut, but that’s about the only advantage I can see in it. For small cup sizes (A, nearly A), it does offer enough support, but if you are B or above, it just doesn’t do the job very well, I’ve found. Metal “spiral” boning is obviously the most sturdy, but it can’t be custom-cut at home, so you have to order it to the exact size(s) needed for your unique stays. I really like flat, quarter-inch-wide reed boning, because it’s available at any craft store, can be custom-cut at home, won’t rust with washing, and mimics the support of whalebone quite nicely. You can usually get a 24″ length at Michael’s or Hobby Lobby for about 89 cents, too! Hope this helps!

      Reply
  43. Penny
    June 15, 2012 at 12:00 am (2 years ago)

    How does the wooden boning stand up to washing? Does it keep its shape alright? I’d never considered using wood as a support, even though I’m sure seamstresses have done it for centuries.

    Reply
  44. Jennie Chancey
    June 15, 2012 at 5:17 am (2 years ago)

    Hi again! I’ve had wooden boning in my stays for six years, and it has stood up to washing just fine without losing its shape. Hand-washing is all you need to do anyway. Hope this helps!

    Reply
  45. Lyric
    June 22, 2012 at 10:24 am (2 years ago)

    Just what I needed to know (your response to the lady about wearing stays day in and day out.

    I’m on board!

    Reply
  46. Maria
    October 15, 2012 at 3:11 pm (2 years ago)

    Dear Jennie, this pattern looks very interesting and I’m wondering if the chemise and chemisettes would work under the Romantic era dress?

    Reply
  47. Rebecca Burnham
    November 11, 2012 at 6:35 pm (1 year ago)

    I made the short stays this weekend. The good news is that while I’m very much a novice sewer, I found the pattern fun and easy to use. My problem was fit. Even though I followed the pattern instructions for sizing and did a try-on with my interlining and even ended up taking a couple of inches out of the bodice back, when everything was finally laced up, the stays were still too large, and did not give me the right support. Fortunately, they worked quite well for my friend, so all was not lost, but I’d love to know how I can do better next time. My bust measurement is 38″. I made the size 16 stays with the D gussets, as my bra size is 34D. What did I do wrong and what size stays/gussets should I make to fit me right?

    Reply
  48. Rebecca Burnham
    November 11, 2012 at 6:39 pm (1 year ago)

    I should probably add that I had no “gap” when the stays were laced, and still had some slack in the back. Also,I got lift, but the gussets did not push my bust in enough, so the fit didn’t feel firm and secure.

    Reply
    • Jennie Chancey
      November 12, 2012 at 2:41 am (1 year ago)

      Hi, Rebecca!

      Just got your comment on the stays. It sounds like you have a big difference between bust/cup measurement and ribcage measurement (which is taken around the body below the bust). The answer is simply to go down a size and go down to the “C” gussets for a firmer fit. This information is included in the note to “A” cup ladies, but it also applies to those who are small through the torso below the bust.

      Glad your friend was able to wear the stays you made! When you make your next fit toile, try using a stiffer muslin or even cotton duck (which can then be used as your interlining), since it will not stretch as much as regular cotton (important with larger cup sizes).

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  49. Rebecca Burnham
    November 12, 2012 at 8:52 pm (1 year ago)

    Thanks for the prompt reply, Jenny. I’ll let you know how I fare with the next set!

    Reply
    • Rebecca Burnham
      November 22, 2012 at 11:52 pm (1 year ago)

      Hi, again! Well, I ended up making the stays in a size 12, with the ‘c’ gussets, as opposed to 16 D per the pattern instructions. Go figure—I must have odd proportions, but these seem to work pretty well. Thanks!

      Reply
      • Jennie Chancey
        November 23, 2012 at 12:30 pm (1 year ago)

        Hi, Rebecca! Yep, that means you are smaller around the ribcage in proportion to your cup size–and you got the right solution! So glad they fit nicely. They make such a difference in the look of your gowns!

        Reply

2Pingbacks & Trackbacks on Regency Underthings Pattern

  1. [...] used: Sense and Sensibility Regency Underthings. I used the E-Pattern and only made the short [...]

  2. [...] this pattern before I started sewing and heard that because it’s a Simplicity version of this pattern from Sense and Sensibility, it runs big and to cut out a smaller size. Well, I cut out my regular [...]

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